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Around the Empire: Yankees News - 4/10/15

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Headley's comfortable; Eovaldi excited about debut; Rothschild stands by Tanaka's repertoire.

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Adam Hunger-USA TODAY Sports

NJ.com | Brendan Kuty: Now that he has a home and a back that is no longer barking, Chase Headley is the most comfortable he has been in years. He's glad he was traded to New York and that he stayed and he's very excited to play for the Yankees.

Newsday | Brian Heyman: Nathan Eovaldi will make his Yankee debut against the Boston Red Sox tonight, and he is incredibly excited to get a taste of the rivalry. After an impressive spring training and with the addition of a polished splitter, Joe Girardi is hoping that Eovaldi will be a quality arm every fifth day.

New York Times | Bruce Weber: In what is clearly the hottest take in the history of sports, a guest writer (a Yankees fan, even) for the New York Times argues that the Red Sox are the better franchise; the Yankees have no homegrown stars of their own to keep the Yankees-Red Sox rivalry hot, he argues, and the Yankees tore down their old park to build a "mercenary theme park". Yawn.

NJ.com | Brendan Kuty: When confronted regarding Masahiro Tanaka's changing repertoire, pitching coach Larry Rothschild stood by his man. He reiterated that the deliberate decrease in fastball frequency did not have to do with elbow strain, and he said that Tanaka knew, even in 2014, that his fastball was his worst pitch and was getting hit hard.

USA Today | Chad Jennings: While many have overreacted to Masahiro Tanaka's comments about decreasing his velocity, it seems there could have been something lost in translation. While an English translation would seem like he is trying to dial down velocity, another interpretation would suggest that he means it as a strategic statement, that he is not a thrower and would pitch carefully and with the pitches he felt were most successful.